Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities 2018-10-24T18:17:47+00:00

Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities

Consistent with the recommendations of the work group to have interpreting competence verified, a PDIC candidate is required to submit affirmative attestation from qualified experts in four areas:

Sight/Text Translation– Sight translation involves the reading of a written English document – inclusive of documents such as an intake form, a medical history form, an instruction form, a lease, etc. – and translating it in a manner that provides the Deaf consumer easily understood access to the content. Best practice in interpreting involves interpreters always offering to translate written English documents that are a part of any interpreting assignment in recognition of the preference of some Deaf consumers to receive all information in their native language. In a sight/text translation, the Deaf interpreter directly reads the English text and renders the translation without the involvement of a hearing interpreter.

For the PDIC, the candidate must submit two (2) attestations of adequate competence in sight translation from a qualified expert. The 2 attestations cannot be from the same assignment – rather, each must be from a different assignment. The attestation must provide affirmation/confirmation of an adequate translation of a document that contains at least four (4) paragraphs of English text or 12-15 individual questions requiring a response from the Deaf consumer.

Adequate competence is defined as a translation that accurately conveys the meaning and the substantive details of the communication. Although the translation may have some errors, they should not be errors that impact the substantial details or change the overarching meaning and intent of the document.

Simultaneous Interpreting– Simultaneous interpretation occurs when the interpretation is being rendered at the same time as the parties involved are communicating, with only a minimal lag of time between when the source message is rendered and the interpretation is generated. For a Deaf interpreter, the spoken message is received from a hearing interpreter in sign language and then interpreted by the Deaf interpreter so the message is easily understood by the Deaf consumer, and/or the signed message of a Deaf consumer is interpreted by the Deaf interpreter to a hearing interpreter who renders it into spoken English.

Simultaneous interpreting is used in a wide range of communication settings/events – such as during a lecture, presentation, or other forms of narratives. For the PDIC, the candidate must submit two (2) attestations of adequate competence in simultaneous interpretation from a qualified expert. The 2 attestations cannot be from the same assignment – rather, each must be from a different assignment. Further, one must be for a simultaneous interpretation of an ASL narrative that is at least 10 minutes in length, and one must be for a simultaneous interpretation of an English text that is at least 10 minutes in length. The narratives can be from a range of settings, such as a classroom lecture, conference or workshop presentation, work-related explanation, or social service setting.

Adequate competence is defined as an interpretation that accurately conveys the meaning and the substantive details of the narrative. Although the interpretation may have some errors, they should not be errors that impact the substantial details or change the overarching meaning and intent of the narrative.

Consecutive Interpreting– Consecutive interpretation occurs when the interpretation is being rendered in intervals as the parties involved are communicating—typically, when the communication follows an interview, interactive or Q and A format. One of the participants communicates a whole and complete idea, pauses, and then the interpretation is rendered before further information is conveyed. This process is repeated until the interview, interaction or Q and A process is completed. For a Deaf interpreter, the spoken message is received from a hearing interpreter in sign language and then interpreted by the Deaf interpreter so the message is easily understood by the Deaf consumer, and/or the signed message of a Deaf consumer is interpreted by the Deaf interpreter into ASL to a hearing interpreter who renders it into spoken English.

Consecutive interpreting is used in a wide range of communication settings/events – such as during an interview or anytime a line of questioning is being utilized. For the PDIC, the candidate must submit two (2) attestations of adequate competence in consecutive interpretation from a qualified expert. The 2 attestations cannot be from the same assignment – rather, each must be from a different assignment. Each must involve an interaction where both ASL and English are used as part of the communication process and the interactions must be at least 10 minutes in length. The interactions can be from a range of settings, such as a job interview, a medical, mental health or social service intake, a discussion between a doctor and a patient, and other similar types of interactive settings.

Adequate competence is defined as an interpretation that accurately conveys the meaning and the substantive details of the interaction. Questions and answers are accurately conveyed. Although the interpretation may have some errors, they should not be errors that impact the substantial details or change the overarching meaning and intent of the interaction.

Mirror/Platform Interpreting– Mirror interpreting occurs when sight-line or vision impacts the ability of a consumer to receive a signed message directly, so a Deaf interpreter replicates what is being signed by someone, mirroring what is being said. This is often seen in group settings when someone in an audience stands to sign a question or comment that the rest of the audience cannot access because they are faced towards a stage. Or, it may occur in a group setting where you have someone signing or interpreting into sign language, but Deaf individuals with low or no vision cannot access the information. In these situations, a Deaf interpreter would replicate what is being signed by mirroring the information for the low or no vision Deaf consumer so the message is easily understood.

For the PDIC, the candidate must submit two (2) attestations of adequate competence in mirror interpretation from a qualified expert. The 2 attestations cannot be from the same assignment – rather, each must be from a different assignment where the mirroring lasts for at least 10 minutes. The mirror interpretations can occur in any group setting where mirror interpreting is needed and can be rendered from a stage for an audience-at-large or for a DeafBlind or low vision Deaf consumer.

Adequate competence is defined as a mirrored interpretation that accurately conveys the meaning and the substantive details of the signed message that is being mirrored. Although the interpretation may have some errors, they should not be errors that impact the substantial details or change the overarching meaning and intent of the signed message.

These are skill sets tested in the most recent iteration of the CDI Performance Exam and their relevance was affirmed in the recommendations of the work group. Therefore, these are the areas of competency to be verified/affirmed in the letters of attestation for the PDIC.

Mock scenarios for any of the four categories are not considered acceptable to use to attest to the applicant’s knowledge, skills, and ability. Attestations based on mock scenarios will not be accepted.