*These RID Certifications are fully recognized; however, the exams are no longer available.

National Interpreter Certification (NIC) with levels

NIC Advanced

Individuals who achieved the NIC Advanced level have passed the NIC Knowledge Exam, scored within the standard range of a professional interpreter on the interview portion of the NIC Interview and Performance Exam and scored within the high range on the performance portion of the NIC Interview and Performance Exam.

NIC Master

Individuals who achieved the NIC Master level have passed the NIC Knowledge Exam and scored within the high range on both portions of NIC Interview and Performance Exam.

The NIC with levels credential was offered from 2005 to November 30, 2011.

Certificate of Interpretation (CI)

Holders of this certification are recognized as fully certified in interpretation and have demonstrated the ability to interpret between American Sign Language (ASL) and spoken English for both sign-to-voice and voice-to-sign tasks. The interpreter’s ability to transliterate is not considered in this certification. Holders of the CI are recommended for a broad range of interpretation assignments. This credential was offered from 1988 to 2008.

Certificate of Transliteration (CT)

Holders of this certification are recognized as fully certified in transliteration and have demonstrated the ability to transliterate between English-based sign language and spoken English for both sign-to-voice and voice-to-sign tasks. The transliterator’s ability to interpret is not considered in this certification.  Holders of the CT are recommended for a broad range of transliteration assignments. This credential was offered from 1988 to 2008.

Comprehensive Skills Certificate (CSC)

Holders of this certification have demonstrated the ability to interpret between American Sign Language (ASL) and spoken English and to transliterate between spoken English and an English-based sign language. Holders of this certification are recommended for a broad range of interpreting and transliterating assignments. This credential was offered from 1972 to 1988.

Master Comprehensive Skills Certificate (MCSC)

The MCSC examination was designed with the intent of testing for a higher standard of performance than the CSC. Holders of this certification were required to hold the CSC prior to taking this exam. Holders of this certification are recommended for a broad range of interpreting and transliterating assignments. This credential was offered until 1988.

Reverse Skills Certificate (RSC)

Holders of this certification have demonstrated the ability to interpret between American Sign Language (ASL) and English-based sign language or transliterate between spoken English and a signed code for English. Holders of this certification are deaf or hard-of-hearing and interpretation/transliteration is rendered in ASL, spoken English and a signed code for English or written English. Holders of the RSC are recommended for a broad range of interpreting assignments where the use of a interpreter who is deaf or hard-of-hearing would be beneficial. This credential was offered from 1972 to 1988.

Interpretation Certificate (IC)

Holders of this certification have demonstrated the ability to interpret between American Sign Language (ASL) and spoken English. Holders received scores on the CSC exam which prevented the awarding of CSC certification or IC/TC certification. The interpreter’s ability to transliterate is not considered in this certification. Holders of the IC are recommended for a broad range of interpretation assignments. The IC was formerly known as the Expressive Interpreting Certificate (EIC). This credential was offered from 1972 to 1988.

Transliteration Certificate (TC)

Holders of this certification have demonstrated the ability to transliterate between spoken English and a signed code for English. Holders received scores on the CSC exam which prevented the awarding of CSC certification or IC/TC certification. The transliterator’s ability to interpret is not considered in this certification. Holders of the TC are recommended for a broad range of transliterating assignments. The TC was formerly known as the Expressive Transliterating Certificate (ETC). This credential was offered from 1972 to 1988.

Specialist Certificate: Performing Arts (SC:PA)

Holders of this certification were required to hold the CSC prior to sitting for this examination and have demonstrated specialized knowledge in performing arts interpretation. Holders of this certification are recommended for a broad range of assignments in the performing arts setting. This credential was offered from 1971 to 1988.

Oral Interpreting Certificate: Comprehensive (OIC:C)

Holders of this certification demonstrated both the ability to transliterate a spoken message from a person who hears to a person who is deaf or hard-of-hearing and the ability to understand and repeat the message and intent of the speech and mouth movements of the person who is deaf or hard-of-hearing. This credential was offered from 1979 to 1985.

Oral Interpreting Certificate: Spoken to Visible (OIC:S/V)

Holders of this certification demonstrated the ability to transliterate a spoken message from a person who hears to a person who is deaf or hard-of-hearing. This individual received scores on the OIC:C exam which prevented the awarding of  full OIC:C certification. This credential was offered from 1979 to 1985.

Oral Interpreting Certificate: Visible to Spoken (OIC:V/S)

Holders of this certification demonstrated the ability to understand the speech and silent movements of a person who is deaf or hard-of-hearing and to repeat the message for a hearing person. This individual received scores on the OIC:C exam which prevented the awarding of  full OIC:C certification. This credential was offered from 1979 to 1985.

Conditional Legal Interpreting Permit-Relay (CLIP-R)

Notice: RID has announced that a moratorium will be placed on new applications for CLIP-R Certification.  For more information about the moratorium, please see this FAQ.

Holders of this conditional permit had completed an RID-recognized training program designed for interpreters and transliterators who worked in legal settings, and whom were also deaf or hard-of-hearing. Holders of this conditional permit were recommended for a broad range of assignments in the legal setting. This credential was available from 1991 to 2016.

Candidates were eligible for CLIP-R Certification if they were, at that time, a current RID CDI or RSC Certified member, met the experience requirements, had the proper letters of recommendation, and met RID’s educational requirement.

CLIP-R Certification Requirement

*Please note no substitutions could have been made to the requirements

  1. Must have been a certified member, in good standing, holding either the RSC or CDI.
  2. Must have met RID’s, at that time, educational requirement of an Associate degree or had an approved Educational Equivalency Application.
  3. Attached recommendation letters from two RID certified interpreters in good standing. At least one letter must have been from an SC:L certified interpreter. The other could have been from a CI and CT, CDI, CSC, NIC, or NAD.
  4. Verified at least 150 hours of training and/or mentoring as a legal interpreter. If an individual was unable to have all 150 hours in legal training or workshops, they must have had a minimum of 120 hours of legal interpreter training and up to 30 hours of mentoring in a legal setting with an interpreter, in good standing, who holds either the SC:L or CLIP-R. Verification was required in the form of RID CEUS (preferred) or legal trainings, or workshops. A certificate of completion or letter from the trainer/presenter/mentor was required to indicate the date, location, and duration of the training/mentoring.